E-2 Visa

The E-2 Investor Visa allows an individual to enter and work inside of the United States. Applicants must be from a US treaty country to be eligible and must run a business while in America.

EB-5 Visa

The EB-5 visa requires a minimum investment of $900,000 into a new or existing business. This allows the applicant and their immediate family to live in America and work in that business. There are no other requirements like the L-1 or E-2 visa.

Being able to learn about and purchase an L-1 business all under one roof has made the process simple

Johannes De Jager

L-1 Business Owner

immigrationeligiblebusinesses.com is great! I didn’t know we were eligible for these visas and to be able to search for the business that matches that eligibility is awesome!

Louise Carter

L-1 Business Owner

The E-2 visa has allowed me and my family to move to America and take advantage of the increased economy size which has taken my business to a whole new level

Michael Carey

E-2 Business Owner

What is an L-1 Visa?

Individuals who own a foreign company abroad may qualify for a L-1 visa. The L-1 visa falls under the employment category visa and as such, there are requirements of that person when they get to America. The L-1 category has no annual quota and, in many cases, has a clear path to a permanent green card. As such, the L-1 category may be a good option for some individuals.

The L-1 Visa works best for two types of individuals. The first is an owner of a foreign company. As the owner, they can purchase an existing business in the US and link that business with their foreign company. This effectively allows them to sponsor themselves for the L-1 visa.

The second is an employee for a large company with an office both abroad and in the US. The employee, if eligible can seek to be transferred to the US company under the L-1 visa.

 

Eligibility and requirements

For a business owner there are two parts to qualify for an L-1 visa. First, you need to have owned a business abroad for at least 1 year. Depending on the nature of the business, you should look to have at least 10 employees. Second, the business in America which you are purchasing needs to be ‘immigration eligible’ – Look for the immigration tick on the platform for more information.

Qualifying Organizations.  The American Business that you purchase must be structure as either a branch, parent, subsidiary, or affiliate of the foreign employer. This is important to note as it requires the foreign company to be involved with the US company on set up. Please note, that the industry the foreign business and US business operate in do not need to be the same.

 

Required Duties

An L-1 petition must demonstrate that the beneficiary will work in a managerial, or executive capacity in the United States. 

For L-1 visas, managers do not include front-line supervisors. An exception to this is if you are a manager who supervisors qualified professionals. In simpler terms – you need to be a ‘manager of managers’ both to qualify for the L-1 and when you arrive in America. 

An L-1 applicant can also be involved as an executive, both abroad and when they arrive in America . An executive directs the organization at a higher, broader level with little to no oversight. An executive typically sets company goals and policies.

Can I Qualify for L-1 Status for an existing U.S. Office?

Yes, by purchasing an existing U.S. business that is immigration eligible, applicants can qualify for an existing business L-1 visa.

The initial L-1 visa is initially valid for 3 years at which time it can be extended for up to 7 years if the applicant is able to show that the existing U.S. business is continuing it operations.

During the applicant’s time on the L-1 visa, the EB-1 permanent visa will be processed concurrently. Once the EB-1 visa is approved, the applicant can transfer their visa status to become an American permanent resident.

Can I Qualify for L-1 Status for a New U.S. Office?

Yes. However, additional requirements apply to new office applications. As such the denial rate is much higher than an existing business application. Unlike an existing business application where the business you purchase is already immigration eligible, a new business application is based mainly on detailed business plans and projections. The business plan includes things like the number of employees the new business plans to hire, the expected turn-over of the business, the business location, etc.

The initial L-1 visa is valid for one year only at which time it can be extended for up to 7 years if the applicant is able to show that the new office is meeting its business plan’s growth trajectory, employment levels and sufficient turn over.

 Is it difficult to set up a new business in the US? Click here to read more.

How Long Can I Work in the United States in L-1 Status?

The visa is valid between five and seven years.  An L-1 executive or manager is admitted to the United States initially for three years on an existing business application, or 1 year on a new business application. The applicant can then extend their visa in two-year increments for a maximum of seven years. A specialized knowledge employee is also admitted to the United States for an initial period of three years but may only seek extensions for a total of five years.

Can My Spouse and Children Live and Work in the United States?

Yes. Spouses and children of L-1s are admitted in L-2 status. An L-2 spouse may obtain employment after obtaining work authorization from USCIS. Children are free to study on an L-2 visa. L-2 spouses and children can stay in the United States as long as the L-1 employee. Please note that only children under the age of 21, both during the visa application processes and once it is granted, are included on your visa. For example, if you were granted an L-1 visa and a year later your child turns 21, they will no longer be included as an L-2 visa. They would need to seek other visa options such as a student visa (F-1).

How Do I Apply for an L-1 Visa?

Once you found and purchased an immigration eligible business (or decided to start a new business in America) your attorney will be able to prepare and file your petition with USCIS on Form I-129. Processing and adjudication of the petition by USCIS can be expedited to 15 calendar days by paying a premium processing fee. Once USCIS approves the petition, if you are outside of the United States, you will also need to complete an application for a non-immigrant visa on Form DS-160.  The final step is to schedule an interview with the appropriate U.S. embassy or consulate in your country. The whole process can be completed in approximately a month but will depend on how quickly your attorney can prepare your petition as well as the interview wait times at your consulate.

If you are in the United States on another valid visa, the approval of the Form I-129 will change your status to L-1, with no need for you to exit and re-enter the country. However, the next time you travel, you will need to apply for the actual L-1 visa to be put into your passport via the DS-160 and consulate interview steps described above.

Can I Change from an L-1 to a Green Card Holder?

Yes, the L-1 visa is a classic path to U.S. permanent residency (Green Card) via the EB-1c visa. The EB-1c is much like an L-1 visa, where you are required to have a immigration eligible business in America, as well as the prerequisites of owning a business abroad.

Most applicants do not go straight to an EB-1c visa because;

  1. The process takes 1-2 years before any visa is issued and 
  2. the American business needs to, for at least 1 year, have been an affiliate, subsidiary, or as the same corporation or other legal entity that employed you abroad as an executive or manager.

Most applicants would purchase an immigration eligible business in America and move over on an L-1 visa immediately. 1 year after the purchase, their attorney can file for an EB-1c visa.

Learn more about the benefits of US Citizenship here!

Conclusion

As you can see there are two main eligibility requirements for the L-1 visa. First you need to be a business owner or executive abroad for at least 1 year. You then also need to purchase or establish an immigration eligible business in America that can support your application. Once these two things are in place, the L-1 visa is a relatively easy visa to obtain, with no annual quotas, short processing times, and a clear path to permanent residency.

 Check out our blog for more information!

Individuals who own a foreign company abroad may qualify for a L-1 visa. The L-1 visa falls under the employment category visa and as such, there are requirements of that person when they get to America. The L-1 category has no annual quota and, in many cases, has a clear path to a permanent green card. As such, the L-1 category may be a good option for some individuals.

The L-1 Visa works best for two types of individuals. The first is an owner of a foreign company. As the owner, they can purchase an existing business in the US and link that business with their foreign company. This effectively allows them to sponsor themselves for the L-1 visa.

The second is an employee for a large company with an office both abroad and in the US. The employee, if eligible can seek to be transferred to the US company under the L-1 visa.

 

Eligibility and requirements

For a business owner there are two parts to qualify for an L-1 visa. First, you need to have owned a business abroad for at least 1 year. Depending on the nature of the business, you should look to have at least 10 employees. Second, the business in America which you are purchasing needs to be ‘immigration eligible’ – Look for the immigration tick on the platform for more information.

Qualifying Organizations.  The American Business that you purchase must be structure as either a branch, parent, subsidiary, or affiliate of the foreign employer. This is important to note as it requires the foreign company to be involved with the US company on set up. Please note, that the industry the foreign business and US business operate in do not need to be the same.

 

Required Duties

An L-1 petition must demonstrate that the beneficiary will work in a managerial, or executive capacity in the United States. 

For L-1 visas, managers do not include front-line supervisors. An exception to this is if you are a manager who supervisors qualified professionals. In simpler terms – you need to be a ‘manager of managers’ both to qualify for the L-1 and when you arrive in America. 

An L-1 applicant can also be involved as an executive, both abroad and when they arrive in America . An executive directs the organization at a higher, broader level with little to no oversight. An executive typically sets company goals and policies.

Can I Qualify for L-1 Status for a New U.S. Office?

Yes. However, additional requirements apply to new office applications. As such the denial rate is much higher than an existing business application. Unlike an existing business application where the business you purchase is already immigration eligible, a new business application is based mainly on detailed business plans and projections. The business plan includes things like the number of employees the new business plans to hire, the expected turn-over of the business, the business location, etc.

The initial L-1 visa is valid for one year only at which time it can be extended for up to 7 years if the applicant is able to show that the new office is meeting its business plan’s growth trajectory, employment levels and sufficient turn over.

 Is it difficult to set up a new business in the US? Click here to read more.

How Long Can I Work in the United States in L-1 Status?

The visa is valid between five and seven years.  An L-1 executive or manager is admitted to the United States initially for three years on an existing business application, or 1 year on a new business application. The applicant can then extend their visa in two-year increments for a maximum of seven years. A specialized knowledge employee is also admitted to the United States for an initial period of three years but may only seek extensions for a total of five years.

Can My Spouse and Children Live and Work in the United States?

Yes. Spouses and children of L-1s are admitted in L-2 status. An L-2 spouse may obtain employment after obtaining work authorization from USCIS. Children are free to study on an L-2 visa. L-2 spouses and children can stay in the United States as long as the L-1 employee. Please note that only children under the age of 21, both during the visa application processes and once it is granted, are included on your visa. For example, if you were granted an L-1 visa and a year later your child turns 21, they will no longer be included as an L-2 visa. They would need to seek other visa options such as a student visa (F-1).

How Do I Apply for an L-1 Visa?

Once you found and purchased an immigration eligible business (or decided to start a new business in America) you attorney will be able to prepare and file your petition with USCIS on Form I-129. Processing and adjudication of the petition by USCIS can be expedited to 15 calendar days by paying a premium processing fee. Once USCIS approves the petition, if you are outside of the United States, you will also need to complete an application for a non-immigrant visa on Form DS-160.  The final step is to schedule an interview with the appropriate U.S. embassy or consulate in your country. The whole process can be completed in approximately a month but will depend on how quickly your attorney can prepare your petition as well as the interview wait times at your consulate.

If you are in the United States on another valid visa, the approval of the Form I-129 will change your status to L-1, with no need for you to exit and re-enter the country. However, the next time you travel, you will need to apply for the actual L-1 visa to be put into your passport via the DS-160 and consulate interview steps described above.

Can I Change from an L-1 to a Green Card Holder?

Yes, the L-1 visa is a classic path to U.S. permanent residency (Green Card) via the EB-1c visa. The EB-1c is much like an L-1 visa, where you are required to have a immigration eligible business in America, as well as the prerequisites of owning a business abroad.

Most applicants do not go straight to an EB-1c visa because;

  1. The process takes 1-2 years before any visa is issued and 
  2. the American business needs to, for at least 1 year, have been an affiliate, subsidiary, or as the same corporation or other legal entity that employed you abroad as an executive or manager.

Most applicants would purchase an immigration eligible business in America and move over on an L-1 visa immediately. 1 year after the purchase, their attorney can file for an EB-1c visa.

Learn more about the benefits of US Citizenship here!

Conclusion

As you can see there are two main eligibility requirements for the L-1 visa. First you need to be a business owner or executive abroad for at least 1 year. You then also need to purchase or establish an immigration eligible business in America that can support your application. Once these two things are in place, the L-1 visa is a relatively easy visa to obtain, with no annual quotas, short processing times, and a clear path to permanent residency.

 Check out our blog for more information!

What is an L-1 Visa?

Individuals who own a foreign company abroad may qualify for a L-1 visa. The L-1 visa falls under the employment category visa and as such, there are requirements of that person when they get to America. The L-1 category has no annual quota and, in many cases, has a clear path to a permanent green card. As such, the L-1 category may be a good option for some individuals.

The L-1 Visa works best for two types of individuals. The first is an owner of a foreign company. As the owner, they can purchase an existing business in the US and link that business with their foreign company. This effectively allows them to sponsor themselves for the L-1 visa.

The second is an employee for a large company with an office both abroad and in the US. The employee, if eligible can seek to be transferred to the US company under the L-1 visa.

 

Eligibility and requirements

For a business owner there are two parts to qualify for an L-1 visa. First, you need to have owned a business abroad for at least 1 year. Depending on the nature of the business, you should look to have at least 10 employees. Second, the business in America which you are purchasing needs to be ‘immigration eligible’ – Look for the immigration tick on the platform for more information.

Qualifying Organizations.  The American Business that you purchase must be structure as either a branch, parent, subsidiary, or affiliate of the foreign employer. This is important to note as it requires the foreign company to be involved with the US company on set up. Please note, that the industry the foreign business and US business operate in do not need to be the same.

 

Required Duties

An L-1 petition must demonstrate that the beneficiary will work in a managerial, or executive capacity in the United States. 

For L-1 visas, managers do not include front-line supervisors. An exception to this is if you are a manager who supervisors qualified professionals. In simpler terms – you need to be a ‘manager of managers’ both to qualify for the L-1 and when you arrive in America. 

An L-1 applicant can also be involved as an executive, both abroad and when they arrive in America . An executive directs the organization at a higher, broader level with little to no oversight. An executive typically sets company goals and policies.

Can I Qualify for L-1 Status for a New U.S. Office?

Yes. However, additional requirements apply to new office applications. As such the denial rate is much higher than an existing business application. Unlike an existing business application where the business you purchase is already immigration eligible, a new business application is based mainly on detailed business plans and projections. The business plan includes things like the number of employees the new business plans to hire, the expected turn-over of the business, the business location, etc.

The initial L-1 visa is valid for one year only at which time it can be extended for up to 7 years if the applicant is able to show that the new office is meeting its business plan’s growth trajectory, employment levels and sufficient turn over.

 

How Long Can I Work in the United States in L-1 Status?

The visa is valid between five and seven years.  An L-1 executive or manager is admitted to the United States initially for three years on an existing business application, or 1 year on a new business application. The applicant can then extend their visa in two-year increments for a maximum of seven years. A specialized knowledge employee is also admitted to the United States for an initial period of three years but may only seek extensions for a total of five years.

Can My Spouse and Children Live and Work in the United States?

Yes. Spouses and children of L-1s are admitted in L-2 status. An L-2 spouse may obtain employment after obtaining work authorization from USCIS. Children are free to study on an L-2 visa. L-2 spouses and children can stay in the United States as long as the L-1 employee. Please note that only children under the age of 21, both during the visa application processes and once it is granted, are included on your visa. For example, if you were granted an L-1 visa and a year later your child turns 21, they will no longer be included as an L-2 visa. They would need to seek other visa options such as a student visa (F-1).

How Do I Apply for an L-1 Visa?

Once you found and purchased an immigration eligible business (or decided to start a new business in America) you attorney will be able to prepare and file your petition with USCIS on Form I-129. Processing and adjudication of the petition by USCIS can be expedited to 15 calendar days by paying a premium processing fee. Once USCIS approves the petition, if you are outside of the United States, you will also need to complete an application for a non-immigrant visa on Form DS-160.  The final step is to schedule an interview with the appropriate U.S. embassy or consulate in your country. The whole process can be completed in approximately a month but will depend on how quickly your attorney can prepare your petition as well as the interview wait times at your consulate.

If you are in the United States on another valid visa, the approval of the Form I-129 will change your status to L-1, with no need for you to exit and re-enter the country. However, the next time you travel, you will need to apply for the actual L-1 visa to be put into your passport via the DS-160 and consulate interview steps described above.

Can I Change from an L-1 to a Green Card Holder?

Yes, the L-1 visa is a classic path to U.S. permanent residency (Green Card) via the EB-1c visa. The EB-1c is much like an L-1 visa, where you are required to have a immigration eligible business in America, as well as the prerequisites of owning a business abroad.

Most applicants do not go straight to an EB-1c visa because;

  1. The process takes 1-2 years before any visa is issued and 
  2. the American business needs to, for at least 1 year, have been an affiliate, subsidiary, or as the same corporation or other legal entity that employed you abroad as an executive or manager.

Most applicants would purchase an immigration eligible business in America and move over on an L-1 visa immediately. 1 year after the purchase, their attorney can file for an EB-1c visa.

Conclusion

As you can see there are two main eligibility requirements for the L-1 visa. First you need to be a business owner or executive abroad for at least 1 year. You then also need to purchase or establish an immigration eligible business in America that can support your application. Once these two things are in place, the L-1 visa is a relatively easy visa to obtain, with no annual quotas, short processing times, and a clear path to permanent residency.

 

Other Business Owner Visa Types

E-2 Visa

The E-2 Investor Visa allows an individual to enter and work inside of the United States. Applicants must be from a US treaty country to be eligible and must run a business while in America.

EB-5 Visa

The EB-5 visa requires a minimum investment of $900,000 into a new or existing business. This allows the applicant and their immediate family to live in America and work in that business. There are no other requirements like the L-1 or E-2 visa.

Being able to learn about and purchase an L-1 business all under one roof has made the process simple

Johannes De Jager

L-1 Business Owner

immigrationeligiblebusinesses.com is great! I didn’t know we were eligible for these visas and to be able to search for the business that matches that eligibility is awesome!

Louise Carter

L-1 Business Owner

The E-2 visa has allowed me and my family to move to America and take advantage of the increased economy size which has taken my business to a whole new level

Michael Carey

E-2 Business Owner